CLICK TO VIEW
Restorative justice is a tool for addressing the roots causes of misbehaviour, which often results in in-school and out-of-school suspensions and other disciplinary actions. Students of color, and particularly Black students, are most likely to experience such action, even for minor infractions. Restorative justice practices (which prioritize establishing shared community vaules, personal accountability, community accountability, and the genuine healing for any harmed parties) and have been proven effective causing school districts across the country to push for the implementation of restorative justice initiatives in schools.
Rethinking Urban Education

27.04.2017. / BY Sophia James

It is an approach that empowers students intellectually, socially, and emotionally by using cultural experiences to impart knowledge, skills and attitudes. One of the biggest misconceptions about culturally responsive teaching is thinking you have to tie the lesson’s content to African American or Latino students’ racial background. The common belief is if you mention Africa, Mexico, or famous high achievers of color, it will spark students’ attention.

READ MORE…

The key to transforming the classroom environment is taking the time to learn from your students on a personal level. As an educator, you must ask the questions that enable you to know who your students really are. You want to design an approach that celebrates culture and history, which doesn’t require students to give up parts of their identities in order for them to succeed academically. The educator can use the cultures and experiences of various groups as resources for teaching and learning; such as utilizing present strengths and accomplishments of all students and enhancing them through further instruction.

READ MORE…

Culturally sensitive education empowers and transforms students by helping them to develop the knowledge, skills and values needed to become social critics. The educator must consistently communicate high expectations through instructional strategies, which are connected to different learning styles, such as student-controlled learning groups. Reshaping the curriculum does not mean one-time activities or sprinkling the curriculum with a few minority students. It is authentic, student-centered and connected to the student’s real life. The educator should build bridges of meaningfulness between home and the classroom.

READ MORE…

Sources

1. Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2017

https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016079.pdf

2. Does Your School Arrest Students?

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2017/01/27/511428075/does-your-school-arrest-students

3. The school to prison pipeline, explained

http://www.justicepolicy.org/news/8775

4. Response: How to Practice Restorative Justice in Schools

http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/classroom_qa_with_larry_ferlazzo/2016/02/response_how_to_practice_restorative_justice_in_schools.html


Helpful Links

U.S. Dept. of Education Guidance: School Climate and Discipline

https://ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/school-discipline/index.html

List of Organizations Implementing Restorative Justice Programs in NYC

http://www.restorativejustice.nyc/restorative-justice-nyc/

Restorative Justice: What it is and is not

http://www.rethinkingschools.org/archive/29_01/edit1291.shtml

Example of a Restorative Circle in Practice: Restorative Welcome and Re-entry Circle

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usj2gpiptvc


Education Studies Reading List

Raising Race Questions: Whiteness and Inquiry in Education by Ali Michael

Teaching for Diversity and Social Justice by Maurianne Adams, Lee Anne Bell, Pat Griffin

Confronting Equity Issues on Campus: Implementing the Equity Scorecard in Theory and Practice by Estela Mara Bensimon and Lindsey Malcom

Diversity’s Promise for Higher Education: Making It Work (2nd ed.) by Daryl G. Smith

Student Engagement in Higher Education: Theoretical Perspectives and Practical Approaches for Diverse Populations (2nd ed.) by Stephen John Quaye and Shaun R. Harper

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

The Bridge Called My Back edited by Cherríe Moraga and Gloria E. Anzaldúa

The History of White People by Nell Irvin Painter

The Case for Reparations by Ta-Nehisi Coates (for the Atlantic)

Video: Derald Sue Talks With PBS About Microaggressions on Campuses

http://www.tc.columbia.edu/articles/2015/november/derald-sue-talks-with-pbs-about-microaggressions-on-campuses

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

Raising Race Questions: Whiteness and Inquiry in Education by Ali Michael

Teaching for Diversity and Social Justice by Maurianne Adams, Lee Anne Bell, Pat Griffin


Sites & Social Media Platforms to Follow

Son of Baldwin –

http://www.sonofbaldwin.com/?fbclid=IwAR2MQL_PRjhAyLz1dGcEyKxDh8lMl-0SUZb3FO50bEm0WqRLsZlLb6_j_7o

Upworthy –

https://www.upworthy.com

Shaun King –

https://twitter.com/shaunking?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

Racialicious –

https://twitter.com/racialicious

Race Forward –

https://www.raceforward.org

Feministing –

http://feministing.com

The Feminist Wire –

https://twitter.com/thefeministwire

Everyday Feminism –

https://everydayfeminism.com

Black Girl Dangerous

http://www.blackgirldangerous.com

Dream Defenders –

https://dreamdefenders.org

Colorlines –

https://www.colorlines.com

Decolonization –

Decolonization.wordpress.com

We are Mitú –

https://wearemitu.com

Remezcla –

https://remezcla.com